2005: ESPN at the Midnight Sun game

By Jim Caple
ESPN.com

FAIRBANKS, Alaska – The Midnight Sun game is like most baseball games -except here the shadows are still creeping across the infield at close to 11 p.m.

“Nobody here knows if the lights have ever been turned on or not,” Alaska Goldpanners manager Ed Cheff said, squinting through the golden sunlight at the light towers at Growden Park. “The rumor is that they might not even work. I know they’ve never been on in the four years I’ve been here. You talk to the locals about the lights and they just laugh and say, ‘Yeah, we don’t know about them, either.'” Continue reading

1986: On Alaska’s long sunny evenings, you can watch some very good amateur baseball.

The “Midnight Sun’ game: On Alaska’s long sunny evenings, you can watch some very good amateur baseball.

Alaskans love baseball. On long summer evenings and weekend days, everybody, it seems, plays softball. And when they’re not at bat or fielding, Alaskans fill hometown grandstands to watch the teams of the Alaska Baseball League play some of the best amateur hardball in the West. Continue reading

Sports Illustrated: The Alaska Baseball League – A major league pipeline

“A police officer pulled in there saying, `I know you guys are from somewhere where it’s nighttime, but you need to get to bed,”’ Luis Gonzalez said.

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) -There are so few fans in Mulcahy Stadium this summer evening that a heckler’s game-long monologue carries clear to the pitcher’s mound. It’s the eighth inning. The hometown Anchorage Bucs are tied with the Peninsula Oilers, 2-2.

“Hit it right at him, see how his reflexes are!” he urges the batter.

The man’s voice cuts easily through the quiet chatter of about 300 people lounging in the bleachers at this Alaska Baseball League game, between teams made up of college players from North Carolina to Hawaii to Taiwan. The park holds 4,500 people, but the average turnout for a game is several hundred. Continue reading

2003: An Alaskan Pipeline to the Big Leagues

Associated Press – There were so few fans in Mulcahy Stadium that a heckler’s game-long monologue carried clear to the pitcher’s mound.

The voice cut easily through the quiet chatter of about 300 people lounging in the bleachers, watching teams made up of college players from North Carolina to Hawaii to Taiwan. The park holds 4,500 people, but the average turnout for a game is several hundred. Continue reading